Veronica Mars | Series + Film Review

★★★★★/★★★★★ Review: Veronica Mars, film and series, both produced by Rob Thomas.

In this review I will speak of the series and film as one entity, because it is inconceivable to speak of one without the other. 

Veronica: “Tragedy blows through your life like a tornado, uprooting everything, creating chaos. You wait for the dust to settle, and then you choose. You can live in the wreckage and pretend it’s still the mansion you remember. Or you can crawl from the rubble and slowly rebuild. Because after disaster strikes, the important thing is that you move on. But if you’re like me, you just keep chasing the storm. (pause) The problem with chasing the storm is that it wears you down, breaks your spirit. Even the experts agree, a girl needs closure.” Continue reading “Veronica Mars | Series + Film Review”

My Mad Fat Diary: Mental Health and Body Positivity | Series Review

 ★★★★★/★★★★★ Review:  My Mad Fat Diary based on My Fat, Mad Teenage Diary by Rae Earl.This follows mostly Rae Earl, a 16-year-old who recently left a psychiatric hospital after attempting suicide. She tries to reconnect  with her best friend, Chloe, while trying to make friends with Chloe’s friends Finn, Archie, Izzy and Chop.Oh this show! This show gives me life and then tears it down, brings me up again and then plummets me to the ground. Now here are the things I loved:-The soundtrack to this show is amazing. We have a lot of Oasis, The Smiths, Radiohead, and even some Bob Marley. -My Mad Fat Diary received critical acclaim for its portrayal of mental illness, and I agree wholeheartedly.  Rae suffers from mental illness and has a negative body image. The show kept true to both, even presenting the darkest bouts of her depression, as well as her skeptical attitude (when things go right she sees it as an anomaly and ends up ruining it, however when things go bad she assumes it is her life). -Sharon Rooney’s performance. This show is comprised mostly of witty and funny lines, delivered by the main character to almost perfection, her self-deprecating is ridiculous, and adds much needed comedic relief after a very stressful bout of emotions.-Archie’s sexuality. He is gay, or so he thinks, sexuality is a complex spectrum. I personally enjoyed that he was shown as having his doubts, but then confirmed. He was afraid of how his friends would treat him, at least his best mate has a very good reaction, while another is put to the test.-Dr. Kester, who becomes our therapist, his sessions with Rae are so emotional, even when she tries to lighten up the mood, and he just seems to give her some well needed perspective.- Earl’s mother Claire, and her boyfriend/husband Karim. Claire is the mother and father figure, even if Rae denies so. She is more witty than Rae, and with complex emotions, while Karim, the immigrant that barely speaks English becomes more than comedic relief, but into the support system of Claire and in perspective, also Rae.Now the things I am fuzzy about:-Chloe, her “best-friend” is dis-likable to say the least. I could not find one single thing I enjoyed about her, or found intriguing. However she is an important part of the plot so I will just have to let it go.-Finn and Rae’s ups and downs with their emotional/sexual relationship. I could not believe that they could jump so much between each other, one day they are in love, the other they break up, then they get together again. It was exhausting keeping up with their relationship status. -Rae’s disrespect for her mother. Loads of people seem to dislike the mum, yet to me she was such an important woman in the show, she is trying her best, and Rae does not seem to notice nor care. But anyways, these are just my ramblings, just really, really, watch the show, I even think it’s on YouTube. Do yourself a favour and see this, you will  not be disappointed. 

★★★★/★★★★★ My Mad Fat Diary based on My Fat, Mad Teenage Diary by Rae Earl.

This series follows Rae Earl, a 16-year-old who recently left a psychiatric hospital after attempting suicide. After returning home she encounters her old best friend, and tries to live the normal teen life of the nineties. This series follows her as she tries to reconnect with her best friend, Chloe, while trying to make friends with Chloe’s friends Finn, Archie, Izzy and Chop; it follows her as she tries to deal with her body image ( Rae has issues with her body); it follows her and her suffering with depression and her other mental health issues. But Rae is not the only one with issues, and so the series explores everyone else’s problems, how they overcome them, if they do, and how this affects their relationships.  Continue reading “My Mad Fat Diary: Mental Health and Body Positivity | Series Review”

The 100: Diversity, a horrid future, and luckily, nothing like the book. | Series Review

★★★★★/★★★★★  Review: The 100, based of the novel by Kass Morgan and developed by Jason Rothenberg. This is a review for the first 2 seasons. The series takes place a century after Earth was destroyed by nuclear war, the survivors live in a spaceship known as “The Ark”. Obviously resources are few, so all crimes are given the punishment of death unless one is under the age of 18, in which case when said age is reached, the teen will be put on trial. When the Ark’s air supply starts to die, 100 of these delinquent kids are sent down to Earth so the planet can be tested as survival ground or not. There are many surprises, mysteries, hate-able and lovable characters, madness ensues. Disclaimer: I have read the book and hated it, but seen the show and loved it, so if you didn’t like the book, screw it, watch this awesomeness because  it is worth it. So this is a sci-fi/dystopia/thriller/survival type story, that follows not only the children sent down to Earth (yes, some are under 18, way to go humanity, the rights of the many outweigh the rights of the few right), but those that stayed in the spaceship. It is not only about youngsters trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic planet, but about political dynamics within certain ways of “ruling”, because as luck would have it, we all know that of course there will also be humans on the surface of the planet that ended up surviving as well, and they are as diverse as cultures are today.I am going to think of this show as feminist, now you may agree or disagree, but the dynamic of characters, male and female, is something I have found surprising. Unlike the book, the female characters are bosses of themselves, self-assured, complex,  while the male characters stand at par; it is just wonderful. My two favourite characters are Clarke, the daughter of scientist in the Ark, who becomes the leader of the group and a voice of reason among the children, some of which seek revenge, others truly not care what happens to their friends or family; the other character is Bellamy, who only went down to Earth so he could protect his sister , and a good fellow leader to Clarke, both balance each other out in awesome ways (and I might ship them, but that is irrelevant). We also have Monty and Jasper, who are like the stoner best friends, Octavia, the sister that needs no one to protect her, Raven Reyes, boss engineer, Jaha, the morally-led Chancellor, and just a bunch of other awesome characters.Also can we give a high five to this show for diversity! I do not recall watching a show that had so much diversity in it, from ethnicity/race, to culture/language, sexuality, gender roles. I watch a lot of U.K shows(Misfits, Skins, Being Human), and something I have noticed is that over there, even with all that is politically going on, they have diversified their television for their audience, and I do not mean by this that they simply add characters for the sake of diversity, but that they realize diversity is a human thing and therefore worthy of representation, and I feel like this show is a big step towards doing that in U.S. television. And if you still don’t believe me, here is a post by the Huffington Post about why you should binge-watch the hell out of this The 100

★★★★/★★★★★ The 100, based of the novel by Kass Morgan and developed by Jason Rothenberg.

This is a review for the first 2 seasons. 

The series takes place a century after Earth was destroyed by nuclear war, the survivors live in a spaceship known as “The Ark”. Obviously resources are few, so all crimes are given the punishment of death unless one is under the age of 18, in which case when said age is reached, the teen will be put on trial. When the Ark’s air supply starts to die, 100 of these delinquent kids are sent down to Earth so the planet can be tested as survival ground or not. There are many surprises, mysteries, hate-able and lovable characters, madness ensues.  Continue reading “The 100: Diversity, a horrid future, and luckily, nothing like the book. | Series Review”